Winter at the Maison

Monotype Landscape #1

Winter this year so far has been extremely mild. Global warming has come to Montmirail. In our front garden we currently have a rose in bloom, and our Daphne plant, (which usually blooms first, but closer to the beginning of March) is in full bloom. Unless something changes soon, I think we will see Spring long before expected. Of course since it was significantly warmer in Antarctica this week than in our village, it’s clear that we can’t count on much these days.

One thing, however, that hasn’t changed, is the Maison Conti is currently very quiet. We have our days mostly to ourselves. I do appreciate being able to begin the new year with lots of time to experiment and indulge myself in my atelier. It sustains me for the year. A little winter hibernation is not a bad thing.

I have returned to printmaking experimentation. I spent a lot of time several years ago exploring monotypes. The process basically involves painting an image on a plate and printing it as a one-off. 9 out of 10 times I wasn’t so happy with the results, but the ones that did turn out well were very pleasing to me indeed. It’s a process with a lot of surprises.

Monotype Landscape #2

I have done many fewer etchings over the last few years than I did when we first set up the atelier at Maison Conti. I hope to get back to more of that as the year goes on. I finished my first effort in early January.

Chez Nous”, a line etching

I have also begun working on some relief prints. The difference between intaglio, like an etching, and relief, like linoleum or wood block printing, is that in a relief the part that is not meant to print is cut away, leaving the surface to be inked and printed. In Intaglio, the lines are incised into metal, using acid. The plate is inked but then wiped clean, leaving the ink only in the lines which print under the pressure of the press and the dampness of the paper. I have done very little relief printing in my life. The results are less detailed and fine, but can be lovely in their own way.

“Black Bird,” relief print cut from wood blocks, one block for each color.

“Versailles”, one color wood block print

Our little village is calm at this time of the year, but there are lots of ideas in the air to improve and grow the town. We have a new restaurant being planned, perhaps a bike rental and brewery, we have some crafts people moving in to town to open up their studios for visits, we have a new gift shop and many cultural events in the coming seasons.

Keeping busy

I spent another week in the atelier experimenting and playing, while outside the snow was falling. I tried some slightly larger bird collages, the crow being my favorite result. We have many crows in our village throughout the year, and I must say I am very fond of them. They are extremely intelligent creatures.

I made some dyes using avocado pits and onion skins. I have been collecting both in a little cloth sack I leave hanging in the kitchen. I had several months worth of both. It’s quite easy to mix up a dye. You simply put a couple of cups of either onion skins or avocado pits into a big pot, cover with water and bring to a boil. Turn off the heat and allow the dye to develop overnight. In the morning bring it to a boil once again, turn off the heat and it is ready to use once it has cooled down. Yellow onion skins make a very nice bright yellow dye. Avocado pits make a soft pink.

I prepared some random papers and a few bits of cotton scraps, by soaking them in a mixture of two cups water and two teaspoons soy milk, as a mordant. Once dry I dipped them into the cooled plant dyes. It was a quick experiment to see how the paper would take the dye. I have it in mind to use the resulting scraps in some eco-dyeing projects in the spring. Meanwhile, the onion and avocado dyes lasts for a couple of weeks in the refrigerator, and I will certainly use them again. I have a few people I communicate with through the post, so I intend to dye some envelopes and paper for my correspondence.

Another technique I experimented with this week was some monoprinting. There are many ways to create a monoprint, but one way many people like is to roll ink, usually black, onto a plate and then remove everything you wish to be white or gray. It’s a good exercise since it is backwards to how one usually creates an image, so it strains your brain a little. Once the image is created, you run it through the press onto a damp piece of printing paper. The untouched black areas print very richly with this approach.

I oriented myself by first drawing an outline into the ink and then wiping away the black I wanted removed with small rags, q-tips and dry stiff brushes. I wiped softly to make a gray and more vigorously to make the whiter areas.

It’s not easy to “see” in negative and the results are quite bold and imprecise. You really can’t add any black ink back, so you basically have one shot. It is definitely not my usual thing, but I enjoyed it and hopefully will give it another go.

Another monotype technique, which does not require a press, is to ink up a plate with black and then lay your dry paper on top of the ink, you then lay a piece of tracing paper over that and make your drawing. The pressure transfers black lines onto your paper. You get nice bold black lines on your paper using this approach. Once the ink has dried, the image can be colored in with pastel or pencils or paint. The reason to make an image in this backwards way, rather than just drawing directly in the first place, is that the quality of the line that is achieved is not possible in a direct drawing. This style is much more within my comfort zone. I like the vibrancy of the pastel color.

I also try to keep up with my sketchbook/journal. I began a new one this week that has a different purpose than my daily report, which I have been faithful with for several years. The new one is a bit more quirky and much less regular. I intend it to be a place to visualize some thoughts and ideas that I have trouble expressing in words.